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RiseOfAhrikCoverRise of Ahrik Media Kit

 

 

Contact

 

Nathan W. Toronto

Email: press@nathantoronto.com

Website: http://www.nathantoronto.com/media

Twitter: @NathanToronto, https://twitter.com/nathantoronto

LinkedIn: https://ae.linkedin.com/in/nathan-toronto-5659b69

WhatsApp: +971501273858

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/riseofahrik

 

Press Release

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

New Novel Examines Love, Violence, and Fate in a Matriarchal Society

Rise of Ahrik Follows a Love Triangle Thrust into a Worldwide War

 

RiseOfAhrikCoverSTOCKTON, CA – What if women ruled the world? Rise of Ahrik (250 pp., e-book, $2.99), Nathan Toronto’s debut novel, follows a love triangle—two brothers and a powerful young woman—thrust into a worldwide conflict over the struggle for men’s rights in a matriarchal society.

 

Women have ruled the world in peace for two thousand years. Before women’s rule, men nearly destroyed humanity and civilization in a conflict known through time only as The War. This ancient memory of The War has strengthened women’s rule for an age, but now men have begun to call for rights.

 

“To better understand the choices we make in war and peace,” says Toronto, “I imagined a society that had achieved utopia, then thought about what would threaten it.” In Rise of Ahrik, Zharla, the young heiress of a powerful mining family, must choose between two brothers to marry. She loves Shahl and is sympathetic to his work for men’s rights, but instead she is forced to marry his brother Ahrik, a soldier sworn to defend women’s rule. But when the man she loves is accused of a horrific attack on her, Zharla is forced to choose between loving the husband she hates and seeking revenge against the man she once loved.

 

Rise of Ahrik ($2.99, ebook, 978-0-9976550-0-1) runs 263 pages, and is available from Amazon, iBooks, Nook, BookBaby, and other retailers. For more information on the author, visit his website (www.nathantoronto.com) or follow him on Twitter (@NathanToronto).

 

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About the Author: Nathan Toronto is a science fiction writer and professor of war and strategy. He lives in the Middle East with his wife and four children. He wears bow ties and his playlist is all U2.

 

Author Bios

 

Two Lines

Nathan Toronto is a science fiction writer and professor of strategy. He lives in the Middle East with his wife and four children. He wears bow ties and his playlist is all U2.

 

50 Words

Nathan Toronto loves stories, and has been known to stay up until three o’clock reading military history. His debut novel, Rise of Ahrik, tells of a love triangle in a matriarchal society thrust into a worldwide war. He’s lived in eight countries, visited 23 others, and speaks four languages.

 

100 Words

Nathan Toronto loves stories about war, and has been known to stay up until three o’clock in the morning reading military history and science fiction. His debut novel, Rise of Ahrik, tells of a love triangle in a matriarchal society thrust into a worldwide war. He is currently writing the sequel, Revenge of the Emerald Moon, as well as an academic book, How Militaries Learn. When he is not writing, he likes to run, play the piano, and eat waffles by pouring syrup in every hole then raising the waffle to let the excess drain off.

 

300 Words

Nathan Toronto loves stories about war, and always makes a beeline for the science fiction section of a bookstore. His debut novel, Rise of Ahrik, tells of a love triangle in a matriarchal society thrust into a worldwide war. He is currently writing the sequel, Revenge of the Emerald Moon, the story of a lunar algae farmer whose wife is abducted by human traffickers. His current academic book project, How Militaries Learn, explores how militaries from the Middle East to the West develop the intellectual foundations of battlefield success, which he sees as one of the untold stories of warfare in the modern age.

 

When he is not writing stories, he likes to run, play the piano, and eat waffles by pouring syrup in every hole then raising the waffle to let the excess drain off. He lives in the Middle East, where he is a professor of strategy starved of watching college football in the fall. He has lived in eight countries, visited 23 others, and speaks Arabic, Spanish, and Hebrew.

 

His greatest joy is his family. He met his wife at his sister’s wedding and courted her from halfway around the world, after which they married, then dated. Despite the odd beginning, they have been married fifteen years and have four children. Nathan’s children were with him when he learned to tie his first bow tie, and they wrinkle their noses and scrunch their faces on the rare occasions he wears a conventional necktie. Even though Nathan writes stories that only adults would care to read, he writes to make adults imagine a world they’d be proud to leave to their children.

 

Book Synopsis

 

Rise of Ahrik is a story about human strength and redemption. It has been thousands of years since The War, and civilization has endured a slow rebirth under the rule of women, but war threatens once again. Zharla, the young scioness of a powerful mining clan, must choose between two brothers to marry: Ahrik, a petulant military officer soon to be sent off to war, or Shahl, an aspiring scholar and the one she loves. She is forced to marry Ahrik, but when Shahl is accused of a vicious attack on Zharla, the three begin to discover that the attack, the war, and the secret clones that fight it are bound together in an awful triad that seeks to rob them of their agency and destroy women’s rule. Civilization once again hangs by a thread.

 

Rise of Ahrik explores the meaning of love, violence, and agency in time of war. Zharla unravels the sickening mystery behind her attacker, and the truth is far from what she expects. Guilt born of his actions at war drives Ahrik to bridle his hatred and question what he is fighting for. Shahl is plunged into a dark world of violence and revenge, and he struggles with what it means to be human when everything seeks to dehumanize him. These three storylines intertwine as Ahrik, Zharla, and Shahl gradually discern the forces working to control them.

 

These three storylines collide in one final battle over the fate of their society. Ahrik may have risen to rule the world, but the cost is measured in peace destroyed, lives ruined, and love lost. Ahrik, Zharla, and Shahl will never be the same again.

 

Sample

 

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Suggested Interview Questions

 

  • Why did you write Rise of Ahrik?
  • You have a full-time job. When do you find time to write?
  • The dedication is in a different language—si vis pacem para bellum. What does it mean?
  • You’ve lived overseas a lot. What’s the most interesting place you’ve lived?
  • How do you deal with jetlag?
  • You’ve never served in the military. What makes you think you can write a book about war?
  • In Rise of Ahrik, society is ruled by women. What made you want to write a book about a matriarchal society?
  • Where do you find inspiration for your characters?
  • You’re a professor of war and strategy. That’s a decent gig. Why take the time and effort to write science fiction?
  • Who are your favorite authors?
  • What are you reading now?
  • Why did you decide to self-publish?

 

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Book Cover

Top Ten Reasons Americans Should Visit a Foreign Country

 

10. You get a cool passport, with cool stamps.

9. To appreciate that greatest of American inventions: the drive-thru.

8. You find out how many languages you don’t know.

7. To learn what it’s like to get swindled because you haven’t converted the currency right.

6. To see what other countries consider toilet paper (if they even use it).

5. You get to be the person who posts all those pictures on Facebook.

4. You realize that ethnic food is nothing like it tastes in America.

3. To learn that Americans’ sense of personal space is exactly that: space.

2. To appreciate American freedoms, then realize you might be stuck with a Trump.

1. The bugs you step on are actually eaten in some places.